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Ian Lurie

Ian Lurie

Ian Lurie is CEO and founder of Portent Inc. He is co-author of the 2nd edition of the Web Marketing All-In-One for Dummies and wrote the sections on SEO, blogging, social media and web analytics. He's recorded training for Lynda.com, writes regularly for the Portent Blog and has been published on AllThingsD, Forbes.com and TechCrunch. And, Ian speaks at conferences around the world, including SearchLove, MozCon, SIC and ad:Tech.

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Articles by Ian Lurie

Ian Lurie //  28 Jun, 2004

Why did Comdex fail?

I’d argue Comdex failed because the conference organizers did not have an ongoing conversation with their attendees. In contrast to Comdex, Jupiter Media’s Search engine Strategies conference is successful. Why? Well the Search Engine Strategies conference is linked with one of the leading web sites about search engines: SearchEngineWatch.com. SearchEngineWatch.com’s has a large subscriber base… Read More

Ian Lurie //  17 Jun, 2004

Search Engine Optimization: Don’t Forget the Audience

Here’s a great article about the forgotten element of SEO: The searchers. I see lots of folks who dive into search engine optimization campaigns with enthusiasm, and end up with a site that reads like those papers we all wrote in high school where we just… had… to get… ten… more… words… I spend a… Read More

Ian Lurie //  14 Jun, 2004

Keep the Ball Rolling: Ruminations on Conversation Marketing

Thoughts about Internet marketing versus traditional marketing, and where Conversation Marketing fits in. Warning, this essay is stream-of-consciousness…

conversation

Ian Lurie //  12 Jun, 2004

Making Conversations Work

Hey, if you want to learn Conversation Marketing, start at the root: Learn how to work a room, first. Here’s a piece that provides one of the best play-by-plays I’ve ever seen: How to Work A Room.

Ian Lurie //  28 Mar, 2004

Yahoo: Mad with the Power of it All

Last week, a colleague of mine told me her web site was banned from Yahoo!. Why? We don’t know for sure, but it appears her site was banned because it’s an affiliate site – she makes money by providing a well-organized, well-promoted site that drives traffic to other web sites. Apparently, Yahoo is beginning a… Read More

Ian Lurie //  28 Mar, 2004

Towards a Graphics-Free Web

Here’s a radical idea: The Internet would be better if designers worked to make it graphics-free. Whoa, you say – I like all the pretty pictures. If there aren’t any graphics, it’ll be boring! True enough. A graphics-free web is a goal, and like a lot of goals, you set it with the idea that… Read More

Ian Lurie //  23 Mar, 2004

Sound Smart: The Value of Good Code

I just finished reading Designing with Web Standards – re-reading it, actually. It’s a must-read for anyone who builds web sites. I also strongly recommend reading the first one or two chapters if you’re looking to hire a web design firm. Why? Because Zeldman makes a great argument for why HTML code – all that… Read More

Ian Lurie //  22 Mar, 2004

Yahoo’s New Rules

With Yahoo’s new search engine comes a new set of rules. In case you didn’t know, Yahoo no longer uses Google to drive web search results. They’re using their own search engine, and they’ve combined it with their anti-spam technology to really crack down on sites that use anything resembling questionable tactics. If you: Duplicate… Read More

Ian Lurie //  21 Mar, 2004

What is conversation marketing?

A few years ago, John Cass – one of the best Internet and permission marketers I know – and I were sitting around trying to figure out how to describe this business. Internet communications is half PR (as John will tell you), a quarter marketing and a quarter technology. What separates the Internet from other… Read More

Ian Lurie //  20 Mar, 2004

Hits, Sessions and Visits: Reading A Traffic Report Accurately

Standard web analytics packages, such as WebTrends, Urchin and Webalizer, provide a wealth of information about your site’s performance. But which information matters? Hits? Visits? Pageviews? Sessions? Maybe all of the above, but you need to understand what each statistic means if you’re going to make sense of it all.