Technical SEO: BS. Own it. The Slides and the Links

Ian Lurie

Here are the slides and links from “Technically, SEO,” in which I ranted, raved and talked about technical SEO for marketers. This focuses on issues I found on automotive industry sites, but it all holds true everywhere.

The Deck

Random

Me, on Twitter

I wrote a free e-book about technical SEO. It’s free. Get it here.

checkgzipcompression.com: Test whether your server is using GZIP compression

Google Page Speed Insights: Site speed analysis. I don’t love it, but if Google speaks, you need to listen

httpstatus.io: Check for redirection and correct server response codes

Majestic SEO: Link authority and analysis

Moz Open Site Explorer: Another must-use link analysis tool

Robotstxt.org: The definitive guide to the Robots file and meta tags

Screaming Frog SEO Spider

The Ultimate Guide to Page Speed: A series of blog posts my team wrote about making your site blazing fast. Geekery abounds

Web Developer Extension for Chrome

WebPageTest.org: Web page speed testing, including rendering time

Ian Lurie
Founder

Ian Lurie is the founder of Portent. He's been a digital marketer since the days of AOL and Compuserve (that's more than 25 years, if you're counting). Ian's recorded training for Lynda.com, writes regularly for the Portent Blog and has been published on AllThingsD, Smashing Magazine, and TechCrunch. Ian speaks at conferences around the world, including SearchLove, MozCon, Seattle Interactive Conference and ad:Tech. He has published several books about business and marketing: One Trick Ponies Get Shot, available on Kindle, The Web Marketing All-In-One Desk Reference for Dummies, and Conversation Marketing. Ian is now an independent consultant and continues to work with the Portent team, training the agency group on all things digital. You can find him at www.ianlurie.com

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Comments

  1. Ian, thank you so much for sharing these slides. I learned about some Screaming Frog functions I’ve never used before. Do you have any tips for optimizing the speed performance of Screaming Frog while running a large crawl? Seems like the program gets bogged down easily while crawling large client sites

  2. Sometimes “can’t be done” or “too hard” really means:
    ” I could do it but it would take a lot of work – which I can’t 100% quantify down to the half hour at this point. A lot of work which you would be unwilling to pay me for. A lot of time that you would say isn’t really required because you read a blog about how to do it in WordPress so now you know everything and that’s why you’ll only pay me three hours to do it. And no, there isn’t a switch I can flick labled ‘display on first page of Google’ “

  3. Impressive Ian. I was looking through some competitor data on SEMrush and saw how you guys were ranking incredibly well for “PPC” and other related terms. I decided to take a quick glance at the post and then the rest of the site and since I’ve last visited (years ago), it’s continued to be impressive. Congrats on all the success. I’ll keep you guys in mind if any very large projects we feel we can’t handle come to the table. Surprisingly, these do land in our laps occasionally. Anyhoo, great all around.

    1. Hi Renee,
      I don’t think they recorded it. I may present it as a webinar in the next few months, though.
      Ian

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